Shrine in the Mind

.

Rainbow bands charging headlong
into solid stripes of curving streets
taking the bend and folding back
like curling candy
on Brighton Rock
Plymouth ploughshares tilling the earthbound
lyming loam, crumbling comfort
redolent goodness, rocky road regalia
shining in the mind
living angels of imagination-shaped presence
one sets out in front
so they marvelously reflect back
the universal luminosity
found within
mirroring outer realm’s Sun
and outer realm’s Moon.

Majesty for all
and for all
a
good
night!

The above is a spontaneously composed riff from the arising thought that shrines, like deities, are expressions of inner luminosity and as such can be described as angels. Everyday life can appear humdrum. Or it’s essential brilliance can be appreciated. A shrine encourages us towards the latter. Either way, this living dream we call ‘life’ is a “wonderful world,” as Louis Armstrong so beautifully sang in farewell to a world he had graced with his irrepressibly joyful presence.

The song itself can also be regarded as a shrine, as can any uplifted work of art which every true work of art should be for otherwise, why bother? In certain spiritual traditions the art of living simply involves experiencing sacredness all the time which, like any shrine, means seeing the inherent brilliance and luminosity in each and every outer and inner experience.

Note from the Secretary: we will now probably do a little less labelling of poetry offering such as ‘haibun’ or ‘haiku’ or ‘poem’ or whatever as the author settles back down into his customary modality of spontaneous verse. During times of strong meditation probably haiku will be favoured for they are the quintessential expression of that sort of awareness state. But since most of the time the Baron is blundering around through the under-brushes like everyone else dealing with everyday life so haiku won’t always be the form of choice. For example, this post could be described as a haibun but so what? It is what it is, namely a poem with a little bit of commentary or accompanying prose, and as such needs no label other than its title.

Published by The Baron

Retired non-profit administrator.

One thought on “Shrine in the Mind

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